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Angus and Dundee Travel Guide - Scotland

The ancient county of Angus incorporates magnificent peaks overlooking the Angus Glens with lush agricultural land and a rich and diverse coastline.

You will be assured the warmest of welcomes and a long lasting impression of the area, its beauty and of course, the friendliest of people.

The area inspired J.M. Barrie to write the famous novel, Peter Pan.

Angus boasts 25 golf courses including the Championship courses, Carnoustie and Monifeith, ten Monroes (mountains over 3000 feet in height), plentiful rivers, lochs, and miles of golden, sandy beaches. Drenched in history, reminders of the area's turbulent past are left in the form of 1000 BC Pictish settlements and Pictish stones, 1st century Roman camps, Captain Scott's RRS Discovery, castles, abbeys and a number of 6th century historic sites and Iron Age settlements.

In 1057 King Malcolm Canmore set up his first parliament in Forfar.

Arbroath Abbey witnessed the signing of The Declaration of Arbroath in 1320, which confirmed and legitimised Scotland's independence from England.

The Angus Glens offer a haven for hillwalkers and hikers alike, as they did all those years ago to the likes of William Wallace, Robert the Bruce and the Marquis of Montrose and Claverhouse, more locally known as Bonnie Dundee.

Beautiful walks into the mountains and beyond will take you along the ancient routes once used for centuries by armies, whisky smugglers and drovers. In Angus's Country parks, there are many activities including fishing, sailing, rowing, windsurfing and canoeing. There are children play areas too. There is plenty to see and do in the area with gardens, castles, museums and visitor centres.

Angus owes its prosperity to a number of industries including shipbuilding, fishing, agriculture, textiles and Jute, although tourism is becoming more and more important to the livelihood of many towns.

The bird sanctuary at Montrose is one of Scotland's most important feeding grounds for a huge variety of birds.

Round it all off by taking a trip on the Caledonian Steam Railway which operates between Brechin and Bridge of Don, or visit the spectacular ships and learn about their history at Discovery Point in Dundee harbour.